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"HTML Lists"

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Sun 22/10/06 at 20:06
Regular
"all good things..."
Posts: 25
Lists arenít at all complicated and once you know how they work, you wont forget.

First of all, there are many different types of list. However, these types of list come under two main categories: ordered and unordered lists.

Ordered lists start with the <ol> tag. Now the html knows that it is an ordered list.

The next step is to put in the <li> tag. This tag is always put before and after each item in a list. You can have as many items you want in a list and they will appear directly below each other in an ordered fashion. This is how an ordered list of teams should appear in html.

<ol>
<li>
Manchester United</li>
<li>
Arsenal</li>
<li>
Chelsea</li>
</ol>


This is what it would look like in a browser.

1. Manchester United
2. Arsenal
3. Chelsea

Thatís the default type of ordered list. For unordered lists it is basically the same principal but this time you start with a different tag so html knows you want an unordered list.

The tag for an unordered list is <ul> which must be at the start and end of a list in html.

Remember you still use the <li> tag before and after each item in a list. <li> basically stands for list item.

<ul>
<li>
Mercury</li>
<li>
Earth</li>
<li>
Saturn</li>
</ul>


There are many other different types of ordered and unordered lists as well. Other types of ordered lists are:

Letters

Remember that the basic code of lists stays the same with <li> before each list item. For different lists the only code that really changes is the opening tag and itís attribute.

So for a lettered list this would be the code.


<ol type="A">
<li>
Motorola</li>
<li>
Nokia</li>
<li>
Samsung</li>
<li>
Lobster</li>
<li>
LG</li>
</ol>


Note that this time the list tag now has an attribute. ďAĒ means that the list will be uppercase lettered.

You can also have lowercase letter lists (another ordered list) This is the code:

<ol type="a">
<li>
Motorola</li>
<li>
Nokia</li>
<li>
Samsung</li>
<li>
Lobster</li>
<li>
LG</li>
</ol>


Pretty easy those two because is you want uppercase lettered lists then put an (A) in the code and if you want a lowercase lettered list then obviously type in (a). See, html isnít all that tricky!

A more formal type of ordered list is Roman Numerals. The same principle applies with the list attribute and with the lowercase and uppercase code. This is the code for an uppercase Roman Numeral list:

<ol type="I">
<li>
England </li>
<li>
Scotland</li>
<li>
Wales</li>
<li>
Ireland</li>
</ol>


And for a lowercase Roman Numeral list.

<ol type="i">
<li>
England </li>
<li>
Scotland</li>
<li>
Wales</li>
<li>
Ireland</li>
</ol>


There are also different types of unordered lists.

One other type apart from a bullet point list is a diamond or disk list.

<ul type="disk">
<li>
Camera</li>
<li>
Mobile Phone</li>
<li>
Camcorder</li>
<li>
MP3 Player</li>
</ul>


Remember that this is an unordered list so it has the <ul> tag. The attribute defines what type of unordered list it is. For the bullet point list, the opening tag has no attribute, and for the numbered list that has no attribute either. (They are the sort of default lists)

You can also get a different type of bullet list, but the bullets are clear and not filled in. This is called a circle list.

<ul type="circle">
<li>
Mars </li>
<li>
Venus</li>
<li>
Jupiter</li>
<li>
Pluto</li>
</ul>


You also have at your disposal squares if you donít like circles.

<ul type="sqaure">
<li>
Blue</li>
<li>
Red</li>
<li>
Yellow</li>
</ul>


Those are pretty much the main types of ordered and unordered lists that can be used in html. Here is a quick summary.

=All lists start and end with either the <ul> tag for unordered lists and the <ol> tag for ordered lists=
=The opening tag can have an attribute defining the type of ordered/unordered list, for example a lowercased Roman Numeral type of list=
=Every item in the list begins and finishes with the <li> tag=
=In lists you can have paragraphs and line breaks=
=Lists are really easy to remember!=

I hope that this has proven helpful to you and maybe improved your site.
Thanks for reading, gRoZzEr
There have been no replies to this thread yet.
Sun 22/10/06 at 20:06
Regular
"all good things..."
Posts: 25
Lists arenít at all complicated and once you know how they work, you wont forget.

First of all, there are many different types of list. However, these types of list come under two main categories: ordered and unordered lists.

Ordered lists start with the <ol> tag. Now the html knows that it is an ordered list.

The next step is to put in the <li> tag. This tag is always put before and after each item in a list. You can have as many items you want in a list and they will appear directly below each other in an ordered fashion. This is how an ordered list of teams should appear in html.

<ol>
<li>
Manchester United</li>
<li>
Arsenal</li>
<li>
Chelsea</li>
</ol>


This is what it would look like in a browser.

1. Manchester United
2. Arsenal
3. Chelsea

Thatís the default type of ordered list. For unordered lists it is basically the same principal but this time you start with a different tag so html knows you want an unordered list.

The tag for an unordered list is <ul> which must be at the start and end of a list in html.

Remember you still use the <li> tag before and after each item in a list. <li> basically stands for list item.

<ul>
<li>
Mercury</li>
<li>
Earth</li>
<li>
Saturn</li>
</ul>


There are many other different types of ordered and unordered lists as well. Other types of ordered lists are:

Letters

Remember that the basic code of lists stays the same with <li> before each list item. For different lists the only code that really changes is the opening tag and itís attribute.

So for a lettered list this would be the code.


<ol type="A">
<li>
Motorola</li>
<li>
Nokia</li>
<li>
Samsung</li>
<li>
Lobster</li>
<li>
LG</li>
</ol>


Note that this time the list tag now has an attribute. ďAĒ means that the list will be uppercase lettered.

You can also have lowercase letter lists (another ordered list) This is the code:

<ol type="a">
<li>
Motorola</li>
<li>
Nokia</li>
<li>
Samsung</li>
<li>
Lobster</li>
<li>
LG</li>
</ol>


Pretty easy those two because is you want uppercase lettered lists then put an (A) in the code and if you want a lowercase lettered list then obviously type in (a). See, html isnít all that tricky!

A more formal type of ordered list is Roman Numerals. The same principle applies with the list attribute and with the lowercase and uppercase code. This is the code for an uppercase Roman Numeral list:

<ol type="I">
<li>
England </li>
<li>
Scotland</li>
<li>
Wales</li>
<li>
Ireland</li>
</ol>


And for a lowercase Roman Numeral list.

<ol type="i">
<li>
England </li>
<li>
Scotland</li>
<li>
Wales</li>
<li>
Ireland</li>
</ol>


There are also different types of unordered lists.

One other type apart from a bullet point list is a diamond or disk list.

<ul type="disk">
<li>
Camera</li>
<li>
Mobile Phone</li>
<li>
Camcorder</li>
<li>
MP3 Player</li>
</ul>


Remember that this is an unordered list so it has the <ul> tag. The attribute defines what type of unordered list it is. For the bullet point list, the opening tag has no attribute, and for the numbered list that has no attribute either. (They are the sort of default lists)

You can also get a different type of bullet list, but the bullets are clear and not filled in. This is called a circle list.

<ul type="circle">
<li>
Mars </li>
<li>
Venus</li>
<li>
Jupiter</li>
<li>
Pluto</li>
</ul>


You also have at your disposal squares if you donít like circles.

<ul type="sqaure">
<li>
Blue</li>
<li>
Red</li>
<li>
Yellow</li>
</ul>


Those are pretty much the main types of ordered and unordered lists that can be used in html. Here is a quick summary.

=All lists start and end with either the <ul> tag for unordered lists and the <ol> tag for ordered lists=
=The opening tag can have an attribute defining the type of ordered/unordered list, for example a lowercased Roman Numeral type of list=
=Every item in the list begins and finishes with the <li> tag=
=In lists you can have paragraphs and line breaks=
=Lists are really easy to remember!=

I hope that this has proven helpful to you and maybe improved your site.
Thanks for reading, gRoZzEr

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