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'[GAME] DJ MAX Technika Tune (Vita)'

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Sun 26/01/14 at 23:23:
Regular
"Tip The Scales"
Posts: 869
DJ MAX Technika Tune (PS Vita) Review

Rock Band, Guitar Hero, Dance Dance Revolution. The rhythm game genre was strong throughout the mid to late years of the previous decade. Unfortunately for aficionados of movement to music, aside from Just Dance, there's been a real dearth of titles as of late. However, a revival of the genre is beginning, with titles like Project DIVA (PS3) and ReRave (iOS) entering the scene, it's important to revisit and determine what grooves to boogie on down with.

To this plate steps up DJ MAX, a series that has been developed since 2004 by Korean outfit Pentavision. Initial games only saw release in Asia, with the first international game being released in early 2009. The series of games involve the player taking up a “DJ” role, pressing the required buttons in time with the music as the notes move down the screen.

Technika however, is a little bit different. A spinoff title from the original DJ MAX series, it was originally released as an arcade game. The gameplay screen sees a touchscreen split horizontally into two lanes with timing lines scrolling in opposite directions, necessitating players to press symbols when the timing line intersects, adding sound to the track. Interestingly, misplaced or mistimed presses also add sounds, so poor play also leads to some weird sounding music.

The Vita version of the game works much in the same way, and for the most part it does it really well. The screen is a little small, and as the game works in lanes it is sometimes quite easy to miss notes by pressing somewhat in the wrong lane.

However, this isn't merely an arcade emulation. Technika looks to make use of some of the Vita's more unique abilities, and with it brings in notes requiring use of the rear-touch pad. It's an interesting design that definitely has some potential. Unfortunately, the main problem I had in playing Technika is the problem of how to hold the Vita whilst playing. Allowing your hands access to both the touchscreen and the rear-touch pad is incredibly difficult at times. That being said, Pentavision have included a “touchscreen only” option which changes all rear-touch notes to front notes (and more akin to the arcade edition).

The actual playing of the title comes in a few different flavours – Star, Pop and Club Mixing modes. Star Mixing is your basic, lowest difficulty and where most new players will spend the majority of their early play time, with many of the more advanced techniques removed for simplicity. Pop Mixing is the middle level, adding hold and repeat notes making charts more complex. Club Mixing is the ultimate test – several 4 song themed setlists await with songs being in their most difficult form. There can be some complaints about the lack of a go-between level between Star and Pop, as the sudden inclusion of the new notes, especially repeat notes, is a little bewildering at first.

Being a Korean developed game, you should expect the music to be driven with eastern culture in mind. True, the game contains a fair few Korean language vocals, although even without lyrical understanding a fair few of them do end up being quite catchy. However, do not expect this to be an entirely K-Pop driven affair, though I know some would not complain if it was, as the game managed to fit in nearly 70 tracks varying from jazz to soul, from techno to hardcore, and from pop to rap. The musical variety is impressive to say the least and there should be something for everyone – provided you aren't concerned with unfamiliarity.

Technika also features a fair few bonuses for players that go above and beyond standard practice. Firstly, it can be seen that all tracks within the game have either their official music videos or impressive animated videos (with some resounding oddities) for the background. Additionally, there is a music player mode that allows owners to listen to each track, watch their background videos, and even create a playlist of favourites to enjoy whilst not having to worry about playing.

Another feature within Technika is the DJ Level. This is a quasi-RPG style levelling up mechanism using XP gained from performing well on songs. Greater DJ Levels unlock songs, Club Mixing sets and DJ equipment. DJ Equipment comprises of avatars and noteskins, and adds another dimension to gameplay, adding a somewhat tactical element to song selection. HP and Recovery modifying equipment can help prepare for a tricky upcoming song, whilst Fever modifiers can aid in improving scores. It's a small addition that just adds that little bit extra to the game.

Social media interaction is one of the buzzwords of the industry nowadays and Technika is no exception. Linking your DJ profile with your Facebook and posting up your proudest moments is available, and unlocks limited-use high modifier noteskins and DJ icons.There are also online leaderboards, totting up scores from each mode (or highest continuous combo in Free Style) and comparing with players around the world, leading to an almost obsessive score-bettering just to improve rankings.

The PSP was a great platform for music games, with titles such as Taiko No Tetsujin, DJ MAX Portable and Rock Band Unplugged. With the release of DJ MAX Technika Tune, and upcoming release of Project DIVA f for the Vita, music gaming on Sony's handheld is looking positive also. The multitouch screen works beautifully and the rear-touch panel can be used to develop gameplay that is both interesting and innovative, albeit somewhat sketchy in my experience. DJ MAX Technika Tune is a perfect example of this. Whilst there is a little bit of a tough learning curve with technique required to play increasing very rapidly through the difficulties, Technika is ultimately a rewarding experience and this reviewer recommends it heartily for those who like a little music in their life.

Rating: 8.3/10
There have been no replies to this thread yet.
Sun 26/01/14 at 23:23:
Regular
"Tip The Scales"
Posts: 869
DJ MAX Technika Tune (PS Vita) Review

Rock Band, Guitar Hero, Dance Dance Revolution. The rhythm game genre was strong throughout the mid to late years of the previous decade. Unfortunately for aficionados of movement to music, aside from Just Dance, there's been a real dearth of titles as of late. However, a revival of the genre is beginning, with titles like Project DIVA (PS3) and ReRave (iOS) entering the scene, it's important to revisit and determine what grooves to boogie on down with.

To this plate steps up DJ MAX, a series that has been developed since 2004 by Korean outfit Pentavision. Initial games only saw release in Asia, with the first international game being released in early 2009. The series of games involve the player taking up a “DJ” role, pressing the required buttons in time with the music as the notes move down the screen.

Technika however, is a little bit different. A spinoff title from the original DJ MAX series, it was originally released as an arcade game. The gameplay screen sees a touchscreen split horizontally into two lanes with timing lines scrolling in opposite directions, necessitating players to press symbols when the timing line intersects, adding sound to the track. Interestingly, misplaced or mistimed presses also add sounds, so poor play also leads to some weird sounding music.

The Vita version of the game works much in the same way, and for the most part it does it really well. The screen is a little small, and as the game works in lanes it is sometimes quite easy to miss notes by pressing somewhat in the wrong lane.

However, this isn't merely an arcade emulation. Technika looks to make use of some of the Vita's more unique abilities, and with it brings in notes requiring use of the rear-touch pad. It's an interesting design that definitely has some potential. Unfortunately, the main problem I had in playing Technika is the problem of how to hold the Vita whilst playing. Allowing your hands access to both the touchscreen and the rear-touch pad is incredibly difficult at times. That being said, Pentavision have included a “touchscreen only” option which changes all rear-touch notes to front notes (and more akin to the arcade edition).

The actual playing of the title comes in a few different flavours – Star, Pop and Club Mixing modes. Star Mixing is your basic, lowest difficulty and where most new players will spend the majority of their early play time, with many of the more advanced techniques removed for simplicity. Pop Mixing is the middle level, adding hold and repeat notes making charts more complex. Club Mixing is the ultimate test – several 4 song themed setlists await with songs being in their most difficult form. There can be some complaints about the lack of a go-between level between Star and Pop, as the sudden inclusion of the new notes, especially repeat notes, is a little bewildering at first.

Being a Korean developed game, you should expect the music to be driven with eastern culture in mind. True, the game contains a fair few Korean language vocals, although even without lyrical understanding a fair few of them do end up being quite catchy. However, do not expect this to be an entirely K-Pop driven affair, though I know some would not complain if it was, as the game managed to fit in nearly 70 tracks varying from jazz to soul, from techno to hardcore, and from pop to rap. The musical variety is impressive to say the least and there should be something for everyone – provided you aren't concerned with unfamiliarity.

Technika also features a fair few bonuses for players that go above and beyond standard practice. Firstly, it can be seen that all tracks within the game have either their official music videos or impressive animated videos (with some resounding oddities) for the background. Additionally, there is a music player mode that allows owners to listen to each track, watch their background videos, and even create a playlist of favourites to enjoy whilst not having to worry about playing.

Another feature within Technika is the DJ Level. This is a quasi-RPG style levelling up mechanism using XP gained from performing well on songs. Greater DJ Levels unlock songs, Club Mixing sets and DJ equipment. DJ Equipment comprises of avatars and noteskins, and adds another dimension to gameplay, adding a somewhat tactical element to song selection. HP and Recovery modifying equipment can help prepare for a tricky upcoming song, whilst Fever modifiers can aid in improving scores. It's a small addition that just adds that little bit extra to the game.

Social media interaction is one of the buzzwords of the industry nowadays and Technika is no exception. Linking your DJ profile with your Facebook and posting up your proudest moments is available, and unlocks limited-use high modifier noteskins and DJ icons.There are also online leaderboards, totting up scores from each mode (or highest continuous combo in Free Style) and comparing with players around the world, leading to an almost obsessive score-bettering just to improve rankings.

The PSP was a great platform for music games, with titles such as Taiko No Tetsujin, DJ MAX Portable and Rock Band Unplugged. With the release of DJ MAX Technika Tune, and upcoming release of Project DIVA f for the Vita, music gaming on Sony's handheld is looking positive also. The multitouch screen works beautifully and the rear-touch panel can be used to develop gameplay that is both interesting and innovative, albeit somewhat sketchy in my experience. DJ MAX Technika Tune is a perfect example of this. Whilst there is a little bit of a tough learning curve with technique required to play increasing very rapidly through the difficulties, Technika is ultimately a rewarding experience and this reviewer recommends it heartily for those who like a little music in their life.

Rating: 8.3/10

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