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Viewing Thread:
'[GAME] Prey (2017)'

Sat 13/05/17 at 22:32:
Staff Moderator
"Meh..."
Posts: 1,462
That door's not an obstacle. Neither are those heavy crates. Nor that broken stairway. In fact, nothing is an obstacle, everything is a challenge; if I want in badly enough, then I can find a way, whether I throw a recycling charge and reduce crates, packing cases and displaced terminals to compact materials for crafting, or use my Gloo cannon to build myself a ramp up to the next floor or build a pile of crates and debris to reach a high ledge or pipework, hack the lock that's holding me back or just find an alternative route, it's my decision, limited only by my imagination.

I even have a toy crossbow that fires nerf darts, useful for operating remote switches, out of reach computer screens, or as a distraction for the ever-present Mimics. Comes in handy despite being a totally "child safe" toy.

Not happy with that? how about some power ups, giving you enhanced hacking skills, the ability to lift immense weight, better modding for your weapons? Expand your inventory, add mods to your space suit or scanner, move faster, quieter or even achieve combat focus to slow down the action in critical combat situations. What about increased health and stamina, or the option to repair and modify gun turrets, machines and robot operators? All useful in those tight corners...

Still not convinced, eh? How do you fancy some more "alien" abilities? Morph yourself into almost anything to hide in plain sight or access small gaps, interact from a distance with telepathic and kinetic powers, phase out and appear feet away, leaving an after-shadow of yourself to outfox the enemy. Strike hard and fast with electrical or psychic blasts and throw fear in the face of the alien infestation. Combine these powers to pull off some truly inhuman feats in both combat and exploration.

Perhaps you're more traditional... Shotgun or pistol? Have both, mod them up if you like. For the more powerful opponents, there's the Q-Beam; slow to act, but devastating to any target. Or for machines and electrically-based creatures, you might want to try the EMP charge or disruptor gun. If there's just too many of them to fight, try a Typhon Lure; lob it and watch the little critters gather round like moths to a flame. That should buy you some time at least, allowing you to retrieve that keycard or exit the room.

Of course, if you're smart, you can have it all...

And that's where this game excels, because you will want it all, but in order to get it you'll need to stretch your virtual legs,traversing this huge open world dozens, even hundreds of times, collecting intel, finding missing crew members (both alive and dead), browsing computer terminals and solving puzzles. Every move you make has weight, impacting the story and adding layers to your understanding of the events, and every piece of equipment or power up you gather provides you with more options, more routes and more impetus to dig deeper. It's more infectious than the Typhon strain you are trying to eradicate.

But, and this is critical, the more you change yourself, the more dangerous your environment becomes. Typhon neuromods will give you immense power, but will make all of the station's defence systems see you as alien; you give something away in order to progress along that particular path, and that can be problematic. It will inevitably change how you approach some tasks, and will close some metaphorical doors to you as it opens others. It's actually one of the most enticing yet dangerous lures in the game.

As a result, your second play-through will change; you'll start to question whether you actually need a particular power or upgrade; will it change that event that had you panicked and running scared if you don't take it this time? Could you save that crew member if you chose something different? If you used Morph last time, perhaps a more prudent method would be to to find the key card this time, and not suffer the penalties of too many Typhon mods. Thus you start finding other routes, options and equipment, things you never even spotted a hint of previously.

Your guide through this maze of alternatives is the ever-present voice of January, your mysterious aide and co-conspirator in your escape. It's not long before you find out who this is, and, equally, not long before you start doubting what you are told; conflicting information is persistent, found in recordings, emails, notes, physical evidence and the occasional message from your very own brother. This is a tried and tested formula, working well in both the Bioshock and System Shock series', and it's equally potent here, possibly more so as the effects of your actions are palpable.

Regardless of how much you change yourself, your environment and your approach, the story remains the driving force, propelling you onward, infrequently forcing your hand, subtly guiding your feet to the inevitable conclusion, and this is the greatest testament to truly outstanding scripting. Intermediary events and the ending will change, but the story remains strong, encouraging you to feel conviction in your chosen path despite the more than occasional struggle with your doubts. The set pieces, essential in any story driven adventure, do not feel contrived and offer up the same level of choice for your angle of attack. They must be completed, but you decide how; think "Skyrim in space" but with more impact, more depth.

Of course, a game with this many choices and options needs and equally impressive game mechanic. It doesn't disappoint. Physics, lighting, graphics, particle effects, all are of the outstanding quality you'd expect from a beefed up version of the CryEngine, and coupled with a colossal, fully modelled interior AND exterior, this is one hell of a world to explore, pillage, adapt or destroy. Space walking outside of the space station is both breathtaking and a little nauseating, essental at times and a choice at others. Re-entering clamps an instant claustrophobic feeling over you as you sway a little bit on your "sea legs" (a nice little touch), making combat a shade tougher until you acclimatise. Environments are detailed and littered with little treasures, movable objects, debris. Almost everything is recyclable and can be made use of in one fashion or another.

The true innovation that I can see in this game is the complete lack of limits; if you're clever enough, if you think hard, if you improvise, you can have four powerful weapons in less than an hour, making mincemeat of the smaller Typhon creatures. With this in mind, barring the first twenty minutes or so, the enemy are about as tough as they get (barring one or two set pieces or "boss fights" if you like), big and dangerous and in ever growing numbers, and that can be a little unnerving. There's no learning curve, it's more like "learning spaghetti", a tangled mess of adaptation, "what if" and "maybe..." as you study your surroundings and the inhabitants, formulating plans, mixing stealth with full frontal combat, adapting on the fly.

I was destined to love this. Arkane are partly comprised of old members from Looking Glass Studios, the authors of System Shock and therefore my "gaming heroes". Prey is so good it's as if they reinvented that paranoic spark, plugged it into a supercharged Shodan (see System Shock!) and told it to mess with your head as much as possible before tipping over any preconceptions of the story and making you re-think everything for your next play through. The ending is astonishing (watch the credits; there's a "hidden area" after them, and it's a doozie), and will likely leave you marvelling at your own stupidity.

Will what I now know colour my next attempt? Undoubtedly. But that will change my final decision also, and so the ending will change, leaving me equally stumped.

Convoluted and confusing isn't it?

10/10.

Genius. The best game I've played for over a decade. If all games were this well considered, this well planned and executed, I'd be broke, square eyed and permanently glued to my computer screen.

There have been no replies to this thread yet.
Sat 13/05/17 at 22:32:
Staff Moderator
"Meh..."
Posts: 1,462
That door's not an obstacle. Neither are those heavy crates. Nor that broken stairway. In fact, nothing is an obstacle, everything is a challenge; if I want in badly enough, then I can find a way, whether I throw a recycling charge and reduce crates, packing cases and displaced terminals to compact materials for crafting, or use my Gloo cannon to build myself a ramp up to the next floor or build a pile of crates and debris to reach a high ledge or pipework, hack the lock that's holding me back or just find an alternative route, it's my decision, limited only by my imagination.

I even have a toy crossbow that fires nerf darts, useful for operating remote switches, out of reach computer screens, or as a distraction for the ever-present Mimics. Comes in handy despite being a totally "child safe" toy.

Not happy with that? how about some power ups, giving you enhanced hacking skills, the ability to lift immense weight, better modding for your weapons? Expand your inventory, add mods to your space suit or scanner, move faster, quieter or even achieve combat focus to slow down the action in critical combat situations. What about increased health and stamina, or the option to repair and modify gun turrets, machines and robot operators? All useful in those tight corners...

Still not convinced, eh? How do you fancy some more "alien" abilities? Morph yourself into almost anything to hide in plain sight or access small gaps, interact from a distance with telepathic and kinetic powers, phase out and appear feet away, leaving an after-shadow of yourself to outfox the enemy. Strike hard and fast with electrical or psychic blasts and throw fear in the face of the alien infestation. Combine these powers to pull off some truly inhuman feats in both combat and exploration.

Perhaps you're more traditional... Shotgun or pistol? Have both, mod them up if you like. For the more powerful opponents, there's the Q-Beam; slow to act, but devastating to any target. Or for machines and electrically-based creatures, you might want to try the EMP charge or disruptor gun. If there's just too many of them to fight, try a Typhon Lure; lob it and watch the little critters gather round like moths to a flame. That should buy you some time at least, allowing you to retrieve that keycard or exit the room.

Of course, if you're smart, you can have it all...

And that's where this game excels, because you will want it all, but in order to get it you'll need to stretch your virtual legs,traversing this huge open world dozens, even hundreds of times, collecting intel, finding missing crew members (both alive and dead), browsing computer terminals and solving puzzles. Every move you make has weight, impacting the story and adding layers to your understanding of the events, and every piece of equipment or power up you gather provides you with more options, more routes and more impetus to dig deeper. It's more infectious than the Typhon strain you are trying to eradicate.

But, and this is critical, the more you change yourself, the more dangerous your environment becomes. Typhon neuromods will give you immense power, but will make all of the station's defence systems see you as alien; you give something away in order to progress along that particular path, and that can be problematic. It will inevitably change how you approach some tasks, and will close some metaphorical doors to you as it opens others. It's actually one of the most enticing yet dangerous lures in the game.

As a result, your second play-through will change; you'll start to question whether you actually need a particular power or upgrade; will it change that event that had you panicked and running scared if you don't take it this time? Could you save that crew member if you chose something different? If you used Morph last time, perhaps a more prudent method would be to to find the key card this time, and not suffer the penalties of too many Typhon mods. Thus you start finding other routes, options and equipment, things you never even spotted a hint of previously.

Your guide through this maze of alternatives is the ever-present voice of January, your mysterious aide and co-conspirator in your escape. It's not long before you find out who this is, and, equally, not long before you start doubting what you are told; conflicting information is persistent, found in recordings, emails, notes, physical evidence and the occasional message from your very own brother. This is a tried and tested formula, working well in both the Bioshock and System Shock series', and it's equally potent here, possibly more so as the effects of your actions are palpable.

Regardless of how much you change yourself, your environment and your approach, the story remains the driving force, propelling you onward, infrequently forcing your hand, subtly guiding your feet to the inevitable conclusion, and this is the greatest testament to truly outstanding scripting. Intermediary events and the ending will change, but the story remains strong, encouraging you to feel conviction in your chosen path despite the more than occasional struggle with your doubts. The set pieces, essential in any story driven adventure, do not feel contrived and offer up the same level of choice for your angle of attack. They must be completed, but you decide how; think "Skyrim in space" but with more impact, more depth.

Of course, a game with this many choices and options needs and equally impressive game mechanic. It doesn't disappoint. Physics, lighting, graphics, particle effects, all are of the outstanding quality you'd expect from a beefed up version of the CryEngine, and coupled with a colossal, fully modelled interior AND exterior, this is one hell of a world to explore, pillage, adapt or destroy. Space walking outside of the space station is both breathtaking and a little nauseating, essental at times and a choice at others. Re-entering clamps an instant claustrophobic feeling over you as you sway a little bit on your "sea legs" (a nice little touch), making combat a shade tougher until you acclimatise. Environments are detailed and littered with little treasures, movable objects, debris. Almost everything is recyclable and can be made use of in one fashion or another.

The true innovation that I can see in this game is the complete lack of limits; if you're clever enough, if you think hard, if you improvise, you can have four powerful weapons in less than an hour, making mincemeat of the smaller Typhon creatures. With this in mind, barring the first twenty minutes or so, the enemy are about as tough as they get (barring one or two set pieces or "boss fights" if you like), big and dangerous and in ever growing numbers, and that can be a little unnerving. There's no learning curve, it's more like "learning spaghetti", a tangled mess of adaptation, "what if" and "maybe..." as you study your surroundings and the inhabitants, formulating plans, mixing stealth with full frontal combat, adapting on the fly.

I was destined to love this. Arkane are partly comprised of old members from Looking Glass Studios, the authors of System Shock and therefore my "gaming heroes". Prey is so good it's as if they reinvented that paranoic spark, plugged it into a supercharged Shodan (see System Shock!) and told it to mess with your head as much as possible before tipping over any preconceptions of the story and making you re-think everything for your next play through. The ending is astonishing (watch the credits; there's a "hidden area" after them, and it's a doozie), and will likely leave you marvelling at your own stupidity.

Will what I now know colour my next attempt? Undoubtedly. But that will change my final decision also, and so the ending will change, leaving me equally stumped.

Convoluted and confusing isn't it?

10/10.

Genius. The best game I've played for over a decade. If all games were this well considered, this well planned and executed, I'd be broke, square eyed and permanently glued to my computer screen.

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